Rick tagged posts

Divinity III: Stalinverse #4

The Stalinverse endures!

The world has gone red, and now the epic final confrontation begins as Divinity, Ninjak, Shadowman, Komandar Bloodshot, X-O Manowar, and the Red Brigade all choose their side on the lines of the coming battle… Wait, you think we’ll tell you how this one ends? Nyet, comrade! The universe as we know it hinges on this, so make sure you read this one first, Valianteers!

Well, should’ve seen this coming.

We end Divinity III – one of the most innovative superhero stories in recent memory – with the sort of dull, sluggy talk-fest one might expect of Batman…even Aquaman, for that matter. The art’s still great, naturally, but the writing just feels like it expended all its wind quite a while back; it doesn’t have any of the power we’ve come to expect from the series...

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Sunstone Vol 1

Two women deal with modern themes of sex, relationships, and fetishism in this erotic romantic comedy. So beware all who enter, because, to quote a few hundred thousand readers on DeviantArt: “I’m not into BDSM…but this story…I get it.”

 Sunstone is a gorgeous work of erotic fiction.

The art is sensational: digitally-painted, a blend of realism, Disney, and a dash of Anime for good measure. The skin of the characters glows with warmth, and the bondage gear is inventive and quite interestingly engineered. The costumes range from cute to weird to downright alien at times, but it can never be said they aren’t fascinating. The writing is good, and downright funny at times; I could even indulge the corny bits…c’est la Bodice-Ripper, non? What surprised me the most, however, was a harrowing ...

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The Life After Vol 1

Jude’s life is nothing special. It seems like every day is just a repeat of the last one, until one day, he meets a woman and can suddenly see into her past — revealing that he is actually in Purgatory for suicides. Now that he’s awake, he and the legendary Ernest Hemingway are on the path to change things in the afterlife for the better. Of course, that might not sit very well with the bigwigs down below or up above. Can just a few people change the course of billions of souls? 

This trade collects the first five issues of the ongoing series, that Joshua Wilson (Nailbiter & Birthright) calls, “an amazing work of comics.”

The Life After really is something special.

If you find yourself rolling your eyes through the first couple of pages, keep reading. The art isn’t much to write home...

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Our Cats are More Famous Than Us

In 2008, Ananth Hirsh and Yuko Ota launched the auto-bio webcomic Johnny Wander. Eight years, four cats, and three moves are chronicled in this gorgeous hardcover omnibus, which includes a foreword by Raina Telgemeier (Smile, Ghosts). Hirsh and Ota’s charming reverie about new adulthood will appeal to fans of Kate Beaton, Bryan Lee O’Malley, and Jeffrey Brown—along with anyone who’s just winging it.

Our Cats are More Famous Than Us is a mildly amusing collection; it didn’t rock my world or anything. The art was cartoony and cute, the writing was funny enough. If this comic produced any reaction in me at all, it was slight annoyance at the perpetuation of the idea that anyone, anywhere, finds your cats even remotely interesting.

I’ll admit I’m a grump, and you might find Our Cats quite w...

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The Last American

“I pledged allegiance to the flag of the United Sates of America, and to the republic for which it stood, look where it got me.”

Over twenty years have passed since a global war plunged the world into nuclear armageddon. Placed in suspended animation by his superiors, U.S. Army Captain, Ulysses Pilgrim, is woken by three military robot aides. Now Pilgrim has one last mission: wade through a post-holocaust U.S.A. and search for survivors.

Written by John Wagner and Alan Grant and featuring the unique art of Mick McMahon, The Last American is a brilliant, yet terrifying look at the reality and futility of nuclear war.

Judging by the cover, The Last American looks like a goofy Rambo parody. In reality it’s an excellently-written, strikingly illustrated work of post-nuclear war fiction...

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