Batman tagged posts

Detective Comics #1001

Writer: Peter J. Tomasi
Penciler: Brad Walker
Inker: Andrew Hennessy
Colorist: Nathan Fairbairn
Letterer: Rob Leigh

I mentioned the finale of Detective Comics #1000, was little more than a teaser to bring casual readers back for issue #1001. Well, it must have worked, because here I am. Not exactly eager, but cautiously curious as only a long time non-Bat-reader can be.

The story opens with Commissioner Gordon making a phone call from a playground littered with hundreds of dead bats. The news doesn’t surprise Batman, as the same thing seems to have occurred in the Bat-Cave. Seeking help to find answers, he makes a visit to Francine Langstrom, scientist and wife of Kurt Langstrom, aka Man-Bat who has been away working with the Justice League (Dark)...

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Detective Comics #1000

Writers: Scott Snyder, Kevin Smith, Warren Ellis, Denny O’Neil, Christopher Priest, Brian Michael Bendis, Geoff Johns, James Tynion IV, Tom King, Peter J. Tomasi

Artists: Greg Capullo, Jim Lee, Becky Cloonan, Steve Epting, Neal Adams, Alex Maleev, Kelley Jones, Alvaro Martinez-Bueno, Tony S. Daniel & Joƫlle Jones, Doug Mahnke

Inks: Jonathan Glapion, Scott Williams, Raul Fernandez, Jaime Mendoza & Doug Mahnke

Colors: FCO Plascencia, Alex Sinclair, Jordie Bellaire, Elizabeth Breitweiser, Dave Stewart, Alex Maleev, Michelle Madsen, Brad Anderson, Tomeu Morey, David Baron

Letters: Tom Napolitano, Todd Klein, Simon Bowland, Andworld Design, Willie Schubert, Josh Reed, Rob Leigh, Sal Cipriano, Clayton Cowles

1000 issues is a milestone few characters will ever see, and even fewer titles will see...

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Batman/The Maxx: Arkham Dreams #2-3

At the end of my review of Issue #1 of this five-issue miniseries I pointed out that readers who are new to The Maxx might find themselves a bit lost. I said, “Just roll with it, and enjoy the ride.” If you are that lost person and found you couldn’t heed my advice, stop now. The story isn’t going to suddenly pop into clarity for you in Issue #2.

Issue #1 closed in Arkham Asylum, with Dr. Disparu connecting Penguin into the system that allows him to tap into the subconscious world of The Outback. Meanwhile in The Outback, The Maxx and Batman found themselves in the tentacles of a giant Deadly Poisonous Air Blowfish. Issue #2 opens just a few moments later, with the duo slicing their way free, turning the Blowfish into a Salvador Dali-esque blob, with Penguin’s face...

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Batman/The Maxx: Arkham Dreams #1

I can’t remember the last time I was legitimately excited to read Bat-anything. I was excited to read this. The Maxx is a hero I’ve always loved, I his much too short-lived TV run as part of MTV’s Oddities, and I loved the comic. Due to a number of factors, I’ve only read about 1/3 of The Maxx series, even with several reprints over the years, although this title allowed me to discover an upcoming omnibus collection coming in the near future. But that’s another story for another review. Today we are looking at what happens when you drop The Maxx into the slums of Gotham and when you drop Batman into the wilds of The Outback in Maxx’s head.

Issue #1 opens in The Outback of Maxx’s mind, as he gives us a brief setup of something strange happening there...

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The Joker / Daffy Duck #1

When I first started writing for Geek-o-Rama I had a schtick. I opened all my reviews with “I have a confession to make”. It seemed like a fun idea to stand out, until it wasn’t. Well here we go again:

I have a confession to make. I really really really expected to hate this, and I am happy to say I was wrong.

Scott Lobdell’s story (brilliantly titled “Why Tho Theriouth”) was spot on. His Joker fell along the lines of Mark Hamil’s characterization, which is probably my favorite Joker. His Daffy hit all the right beats going from happy, to exasperated, to deadpan, to rage, and in the course of one page flipped my whole outlook on what I was getting into. By writing Daffy’s telltale lisp, Lobdell is able to use it as the running gag it should be.

Andrew Dalhouse’s colors worked well througho...

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